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jim crow. the statistics she writes about where black people are right now when the 21st century we are underemployed, unemployed, more afflicted with aids than other diseases of obesity and diabetes. more of us are incarcerated and get tough sentences for the same crimes. the suns in the black community for me is deafening coming from our generation. we would protest everything. as you said after we got the voting rights and civil rights, we wanted more and 65. why do you think -- >> guest: you can see the difference behind the kind of support king got when he was fighting for civil rights reforms after 1965 the level of support for king if you look at the polls, overwhelming support in the black community, widespread support even among the whites for what he was trying to do. if you look at after 65 when he moved to chicago and when he takes a stand on viet nam and higgins to support garbage workers and poor people in the poor people's campaign which is the first occupied movement he wanted to occupy the national mall even though the occupied campaign in recent years no one put fo
that is to take what jim cramer says and do the exact opposite. >> guest: if i didn't have small kids i might have tried it out from fortuitous see what happens. somebody in the university of dayton actually ran all the pictures of the various times through the various computer simulations and found that the best thing you can do is shoot in the dimensions and there were some corollaries to this putative was the small where the company will likely that it would work she walked away from them beyond, and he has a huge following. people really liked him. she makes the stocks look like a lot of fun. i watched the show i have to confess to i wanted to turn it off in about 30 seconds. screaming mad, why would anybody want to scream at me about stocks. >> host: you are screaming talking about them. i get the same feeling. >> guest: people find this quite entertaining. they can make it seem down to earth. they are going to monitor the stocks the way they need to. people have told me over and over again the story is on investing based on the stock tip from jim cramer and then the stock loses money but if
of brotherhood we have a black man in the white house but michele alexander is the author of the new jim crow she talks about statistics in the 21st century under employed and unemployed clear more afflicted with aids and obesity with tougher sentences for the same crimes but we have a black president and i think the silence in the black community is deafening we would protest everything after we got voting rights and we wanted more. leidy think they are silent? >> you can see the difference of the support that king got when he was fighting for civil rights reform through 65 the level of support with the widespread support for what he was trying to do. after 1965 moving to chicago with garbage workers and for people he wanted to occupy the national mall. even during the occupy campaign in recent years no one point* something so for word with his support it went down dramatically. >> host: why? they thought it would make white people angry? >> guest: there was support for the early king for the black people doing well so for them once you remove the jim crow barriers come to the agenda is gone. at
house. michelle alexander who endorsed her but amid the author of the wonderful book, the new jim crow, the statistics she writes about the work that people have right now in the 21st century were underemployed, unemployed, barfoot did with aids and other diseases of obesity and diabetes. tucker said this for the same kinds, yet we have a president. and i'm thinking the black community for me is deafening for my generation. with protest everything. and we wanted more after we got the voting rights and civil rights, we wanted more than 65. why do you black community -- >> you can see the difference between the support team got when he was fighting first of the race before. so if you're in 1865, the level of support if you look at the polls, overwhelming support, widespread support even among whites for that he was trained to do. if you look at after 65, when he missed to chicagoan takes takes a stand on vietnam, when he begins to support garbage workers and poor people, the poor people's campaign which was the first occupied this man. he wanted to bring people to occupy the national mal
and you said you were sorely tempted to try one and that is to take what mad money jim kramer does and do the exact opposite. >> guest: if i did not have small kids i might have tried it but university of dayton actually ran all of his picks from various times through various computer simulations and found the best thing you could do is short anything he mentioned. there were some corollaries the smaller companies the more likely the short would work it is harder to move i am then a small company. >> host: short is the strategy traders use to make money off of the stocks they think will fall. >> guest: is t. just mentioning momentum plays that are already going up, his record has been looked at many times beyond unimpressed but he has a huge following, he makes stocks looks like a lot of fun. i watched the show, i have to confess. i just see a screaming man why would they scream at me? [laughter] but apparently people find this entertaining. and he can make it seem very down-to-earth. but the average person will not monitor the stocks the way they need to. people have told me over and ove
thing you can do is short anything he mentioned. there was some parallels. jim, it's harder to move ibm than, you know, some company like boxes r us on nasdaq. >> host: short is the mane r main strategists use to make money off a stock they think is going to fall. >> guest: right. there's various issues what's beginning here, things going up, momentum plays, you know, barrens looked at the record several times and walked away unimpressed. he has a following. people really like him. he makes stocks look like a lot of fun. i mean, i watch the show. i have to confess. i want to turn it you have in 30 seconds, but i see the screaming man, and why would anybody want to scream at me about stocks. >> host: you scream talking about it. i get the same thing. >> guest: apparently, people find it entertaining, and he can make it seem very down to earth and fun. the average person will not monitor stocks how they need to. they are not going to do it. people told me over and over again, you know, stories of investing based on a stock tip from jim, and the stock loses money. to be fair, if you ask th
of rag linen.com, a web site for historic newspapers. >> we're here with photographer jim wallace, author of "courage of the moment." mr. wallace, why did you select these certain photos if your book? >> guest: these photographs were all taken when i was in chapel hill as a student working for the student newspaper, the daily tarheel. and the civil rights movement at that time was working towards getting a public accommodations law that eventually came apart in 1964. the student newspaper supported the marchers. we had some black students in chapel hill at that time and felt that if they couldn't eat in the same restaurants with all the rest of us, that budget right. and so all of these photographs were taken initially for either the student newspaper or for i served as a string err for some of the -- stringer for some of the local wire services and what not. today in publishing the book one of the purposes was to let some of today's generation who still live in chapel hill and are descendants from the people in photographs know and understand what their parents and grandparents did so th
, there was the defining event and that was iraq's incursion into kuwait. we saw the global presidents put together by jim baker and george h.w. bush nsx 70 hageman of the world's nations. this subset can do that, we have seen a completely different scene and that is what i would describe as the 20 armors and three libraries and they've got about a dozen fires popping up here in different parts of the world. and oliver sudden, you have people who don't have -- a lot of people in congress who don't have the previous reference has basically come to the conclusion that the world is change and they really can't afford, nor do we have the public support for global engagement. when you go back home intact to people back home, it literally is like saying you need to diet and lose a lot of weight and i'll get a haircut or not solve the problem. the amount of foreign aid in person is shrinking to the point where it's relatively insignificant compared to the whole. yet the will to support that going forward into the event step out and say well, we are to be more engaged here or we can do more here or these are the
on the rules and bylaws committee, this jim roosevelt, and the honorable -- to walk us through the process and the rules as they were sent to you that will guide us through this process. madame herman and honorable roosevelt, are you here? good. because i can't read beyond the. without my glasses on. >> thank you very much, madam vice chair. thank you, madam chair. my co-chair, secretary alexis herman and i are here today to recommend the adoption of the rules of procedure. even though today's election for dnc officers are uncontested we must still conduct these elections in accordance with certain procedure rules. last month, the rules and bylaws committee drafted the proposed rules and then voted by mail ballot to recommend the rules for adoption by this full meeting. the proposed rules were sent to dnc members via e-mail on december 21, 2012, i secretary alice germond and there are copies available here for you today. the rules recommended by the rbc for adoption by this full dnc are essentially the same rules to dnc has use for these elections since chairman brown's election in 1989, w
is jim cummings who is a self-described sportsman, hunter, gun owner and nra member. i have known jim for 20 years, more than 20 years actually. he's a highly successful commercial contractor, retiring a few years ago from the company he founded. he literally built many of the schools and universities that educate the children of south florida today. beyond that through his community involvement and service, jim has been simply been a pillar of our community. he has become an influential voice in broward county and has been involved in civic, governmental and charitable organizations. his construction company, for example, has built community centers at no cost from the broward center for the homeless to several boys and girls' clubs just to name a few. it's no surprise then that jim has received a number of recognitions for his long history of community service. jim is also a gun owner of over 150 guns, an avid hunter who has hunted all over the world and a lifetime member of the nra. he and i have not always agreed on gun control issues of the day, and on a number of other issues as
makes clear commitment to hurt and jim hoosiers who served our union and certifying veterans service officers. i have also set a goal in our administration to prepare contracts for veteran owned businesses. they have stepped forward for us and now it is our turn. [applause] finally, our budget puts taxpayers first. i believe government should only collect what it needs. it should return money to hard-working the hard-working taxpayers who earned it in the first place. [applause] that is why i am proposing that we lower income taxes by 10% across-the-board for every future over the next two years. hoosiers work hard and they labor in a tough economy. they save and invest and family and businesses and family farms. why wouldn't we want to let them keep more of what they earn? i know that there are some who say we must choose between meeting a priorities than letting them keep their dollars, but our budget clearly shows that we can do both. if funds are priorities and still maintains reserves well in excess what we need for unforeseen contingencies. let's be honest. we can afford to do
. i went to see what i could learn about the state of human relations with jim and it -- chimpanzees now whether people were still killing and beating chimpanzees and exposing themselves to other spillovers of simian virus that became hiv. that is true, they are. i heard about sort of a confidential source, i heard about practice of a tribal initiation practice in which involves some rituals that include the eating of chimpanzee arms so people are exposing themselves to the virus chimpanzees carry. an office of the wildlife department in the southeastern corner i saw a poster, an aids awareness poster getting back to your question. french is the colonial language people still speak, a poster in fringe trying to educate people about the dangers, the red diarrhea, what the poster said, practice safe sex, don't exchange needles, and what they say in southeastern cameron is don't eat the apes, don't eat the chimps, don't read the girls. that is aids education. >> thank you for being here. i am dr. sam hancock of emerald planet tv. the transportation system supply chain within 24 hours as
-- explanation of the rules of procedure. >> good morning. thank you very, very much, jim. jim has outlined the process of how we will begin. i will start with reminding this body of the specific provisions that are contained in our charter and bylaws that guide the election of offices for the party. after that, my co-chair will come back to the podium and then review with this body what we are specifically recommending to govern these elections today. first, i shall remind this body that the rules of procedures contain the following key provisions. first, that candidates for any dnc office position had to file a nomination statement with the dnc secretary by 8 p.m. sunday, january the 20th, 2012, and that included -- sorry, 2013. that really would have been a problem. >> yeah. [laughter] >> that included signatures of at least 20dnc members. each candidate for chair is entitled to a total of ten minutes for nominating and seconding speeches to be divided among no more than four speakers, all of whom must be dnc members. each candidate for the other officer position shall be entitled to a t
or with a touchdown or something. jim? >> do you think the white house speech writers have ruined presidential eloquence? [laughter] >> uh, that's a good question. i mean, they've had them all along, so there are some people who would argue that some of the best stuff was written by speech writers. there's a question of whether or not eisenhower actually wrote military industrial complex, or was it really malcolm moos who was one of his aides? maybe they've homogenized it. maybe, maybe that's the -- i mean, i still think there's got to be some degree of spontaneity. i think probably to speech writer passed on -- when obama said snowmageddon which was an obvious blend of snow and armageddon which, you know, you can concede, of course, that it probably just popped out of his head. and i think a lot -- but, again, they may have, they sort of dumbed them down to some degree. i think, you know, president obama, actually "the washington post" last summer ran a list of about 20 of his slogans, and they're all just dead fish. i mean, together we win, and -- but they don't have any resonance. and so i
's open it up, and let's start right over here. >> jim bixler. lots of economists such as your friend rudy dornbush from mit that you mentioned, are believers that competition is the hallmark of a country thriving, growing including jobs, etc. and lots of economists even before the euro was instituted argued that they needed europe more competition rather than a coordinated currency, etc. and they predicted bad woes for europe under the euro. you've mentioned a lot of the problems on the flip side of competition, namely regulation. give us your perspective in terms of competition, regulation and the euro and government coordination. >> i think it's a very good question. a lot needs to be done there. and i think that at the time that the euro was put together and my good friend bob mundell -- professor at columbia, nobel prize winner -- had different views of how it was going to work out than what's happened. that was not in his idea book, because you've had tremendous regulation there. you need more deregulation. there's no doubt about it. in order to get more competitive. i mean, take a c
presence put together by jim baker and george h. w. bush and the success in the engagement of it. but subsequent to that, we have seen a completely different scene. that is what i would describe as three alarmers and two alarmers. we about a dozen fires popping up here in different parts of the world within all of a sudden you have people who don't have the -- a lot of people in congress who don't have the previous reference have basically come to the conclusion that the world has changed and we can't afford nor do we have the public support for global open gaugement. -- engagement. when you talk to people back home and you say why do we give so much foreign aid? it is literally like saying, you know, you need to diet and lose a lot of weight and you get a haircut and solve the problem. the amount of foreign aid and presence now is shrinking to the point where it's relatively insignificant compared to it. but yet the will to support that going forward and even step out and say well we ought to be more engaged here or do more here or these are the functions that are working. it's
most of these people in the room, charlie allen, stuart baker, richard, jim, p.j. crowley, steve hadley, and i don't think walter isakson is here. brian michael jenkins, names you all know. phil mudd, eric olson, dan, guy swan, evan wolf, it's an amazing list. you know, it is a tribute to you, my friend, because all these people care about homeland security and value the opportunity to help advise. that's great. questions? right here. red jacket. please identify yourself. >> hi, rachel oswald, global security news wire. secretary, can you tell us how close your department is to meeting congress' mandate that 100% of foreign cargo be scanned when it comes into the country? you're operating under extension due up, i believe, to close in summer 2014, and, also, could you tell us about any projects at the dndo office is working on? any new nuclear technology? >> i looked into the issue thoroughly, as did my predecessor, secretary chertoff. it's one of those things as we learn to manage risk, mandates like that sound good, but in point of fact, are extrouter their -- extraordinarily expensiv
years in a next 10 years we will take it to amazing advances. >> last year jim lehrer martha ravitch and bob schieffer was liked by the commission on presidential debates. to moderate the prepresidential and one vice presidential debate. tonight they will share their experiences and what impact the debates had on the 2012 election it's held at george washington university and the opal media institute. it starts live at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. earlier today a group of eight bipartisan senators held a news conference to release their own blueprint for the new immigration bill. plan includes four changes to immigration laws and we will hear more about it starting with remarks from new york senator charles schumer. this is 45 minutes. >> the five of us here today and eight of us in total including senators mccain durbin graham menendez rubio flake and bennett have come together on a set of bipartisan principles for comprehensive immigration reform legislation that we hope can pass the senate in overwhelming and bipartisan fashion. we still have a long way to go. but this bipartisan
jim's courage for where he stand on where he thinks we need to go. i don't always agree with him. i think it will be go do in history as trying to redirect us back toward our limited government. i think he has a lot of courage that way. so, you know, i have admiration for a lot of different aspects far lot of different people in the senate. i see their positive qualities. just like they see my negative and positive qualities. butt assumption -- but the assumption is on those that i mentioned i think are thinking long-term not short term. i think that's a problem for us in the senate. we need to think about what the the outcomes ten years from now not about the political career. >> host: in breach of trust you talk us through the 1997 attempt against speaker gingrich. you mentioned friends over there, john, sue -- >> guest: sue is wonderful lady. she's leaving congress. she's a lame ducker right now. just a stellar individual with a -- knows what she believes. willing to stance on principle regardless what it costs her. john it was interesting to -- his wife got pregnant with twins.
in deterrence. i found that hard to think how you get down to a number of today's world. henry kissinger, jim baker, i think james lassiter, former former secretary of defense, many others have all agreed with that icicle for the world. it's a goal, an aspiration that we should always be aspirational. but it's not something that can happen in today's world and nor could any leader today sit here or in any other chair and promote to you and ocean we had to cut down our deterrent level below an adequate level to maintain deterrence. we have strong views about what that is. we've cut down some 1500 the talk of going down to a lower number. i think are selling is possible to get better if you have comments or at levels of inspections, verification company guarantees about the capacity of your nuclear stock buyout program, et cetera. senator, i know you're deeply invested in that component of it. we can come to some about leader in the hearing, but i believe we have to maintain that. that's the only way you maintain an effective level of deterrence and the russians certainly think in terms of thei
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)